Differences in Sunscreen Advice as Presented on Daytime Talk Shows in the UK and US.

I feel remarkably compelled to write about the difference between the way sunscreens are presented on British Daytime TV and American Daytime TV.

Let's begin with the Brits, from "This Morning"

All in all, excellent advice, including:

  1. The fact that sunscreen prevents the development of skin cancers! WELL DONE.
  2. The fact that screen expires. Good tip re: labeling the top.
  3. Information about what SPF means: although it is a reductive explaination, it works given the context.
  4. The fact that sunscreen must be reapplied. WELL DONE.
  5. A tutorial regarding how much sunscreen to use. WELL DONE.
  6. The claim that a tinted moisturizer with an SPF probably isn't enough. WELL DONE.
  7. There is no scare mongering and no dubious science. It is just good information.

This is all good advice, and presented perfectly for a short TV segment. I would like to congratulate the honorable and right honorable members of this broadcast for getting it right. God Save the Queen.

Let's compare that to the American presentation:

note: My mother sent me this video. The following was my reply to her.

  1. I am glad they are covering sunscreen. V important.

  2. The best way to protect your skin from the sun isn't sunscreen: it is practicing sun protective behavior! Sun hats, sunglasses, avoiding direct sunlight during peak hours, and THEN sunscreen!

  3. The dermatologist has crazy earrings. Like, crazy. Her hair looks good though.

  4. Good note about UVA :: Key !!! SO IMPORTANT, TAKE NOTE, FDA!!

  5. The Dermatologist didn't do a very good job of explaining why you need an SPF 30. Very few people apply enough sunscreen, so dermatologists recommend using SPF 30-50 every day, anticipating the consumer will not apply enough, and they will actually be left with an SPF of around 15 (which is a good amount of protection).

  6. I wish she'd have demoed what enough sunscreen looks like: that would have helped people.

  7. Doctor Anita Newpublicist over here has let me down again when talking about 'chemical sunscreens.' There are about 30 chemical sunscreens. There is really controversy about like, three of them, and they have all been on the market for 30+ years with LITERALLY ZERO adverse effects reported. Talking about how sunscreens are unsafe is insane. One has a choice: use sunscreen, and maybe, someday, have some hormone issue that no one can say exactly what it is, or have to have basil cell carcinoma removed from your face. I don't know why she didn't say that.

  8. La Roche-Posay has EXCELLENT sunscreens. They have even better ones in Europe, like the superlative ultra cream, which has insane UVA protection and is really lovely to wear. That is a good recommendation.

  9. I have never heard of bull frog sunscreen, but I am disturbed by the packaging.

  10. Okay finally the Doctor redeems herself slightly with the sunscreen sprays. I don't recommend sunscreen sprays. People don't use them properly: they just mist away and think they've applied sunscreen, and then say the sunscreen didn't work when they show up to work looking like a cherry tomato. One must spray into one's hand, and apply the sunscreen as one would a cream or lotion. If people did that, they would realize how gross the sprays even are to wear. So thank you Doc for saying "apply a LOT."

  11. Cannot believe they classed sunscreens as: lotion, gel, spray, and stick. Like, these are not good categories. Sunscreens should be creams of varying weights. This is just how it should be.

  12. A DEMO!! Excellent. She should have said (1) a third of a teaspoon for your face, EVERY DAY, and that's if you are lazy, because it should be a third of a teaspoon every 2-3 hours. She should have also shown how to apply sunscreen in small sections to ensure even coverage. She also doesn't know how to use a spray sunscreen either. But hey, I'll take it.

  13. They didn't even cover mineral sunscreens? What the heck.

  14. The hosts were actually terrible, and were just pushing the presenters along.

OVERALL, I GIVE THIS SEGMENT A BAD SCORE.

In conclusion

I AM BLAMING AMERICAN IGNORANCE AND THE FDA'S NEW PROPOSED RULE FOR HOW TERRIBLE THE AMERICAN SEGMENT WAS, AND I AM SHOCKED AND SICKENED ABOUT IT. SHOCKED AND SICKENED IN CAPS LOCK.

Yours in Broad Spectrum Protection, D